Does Your Teenager Want To Be In The Next Superbowl Commercial?

Does Your Teenager Want To Be In The Next Superbowl Commercial?

2021-02-04T21:11:34-05:00February 4th, 2021|

The Superbowl is happening this weekend, and most people watch for one reason: the commercials! If your teenager is watching alongside you and gets inspired to act, this blog post is for you! There is lots of commercial work for teenagers. If you’ve never auditioned before, don’t be intimidated. Everyone had their first audition at some point. All auditioning is basically the same, in that the people casting are looking for a specific look and performance they can find to fill the spot and find the actors who do the best work they can in order to book the role. It’s not likely that you will ever need a teenage monologue for a commercial audition. However, every actor should always have at least two contrasting monologues prepared at all times, so make sure to check out our great selection of monologues for teenagers. You never know when they will be asked to perform one! In a commercial audition your child will usually be asked to read “copy.” This is the term used for a portion (or all) of the script. Sometimes an audition only requires actors to improvise, but most times there is copy. These days the commercial world is all about being real. They want to deliver the copy as though they were a real person having a conversation. Don’t play it too big like you would for stage.

Your teenager doesn’t have to memorize the copy for the audition, but if they are a quick study, it can help give an honest, solid read. Do not attempt to do it by heart if there’s a chance you’ll blank out and forget your lines. When we return to auditions in person, there will be a poster board beside the camera with the lines written on it. But if your teenager is creating your own self-tape at home, they can print the copy and affix next to their camera so they can glance at it. In commercial auditions you play to the camera, which means you look into the lens, unless you’re speaking to a scene partner. The trick with commercial auditions is to be able to glance at the copy, pick up the line and perform it into the camera lens. This is a skill that improves with practice. You should practice this technique at home or enroll in a commercial class if you want to do it professionally. Most importantly, your teenager should look natural and be loose. It’s the person who brings that “extra something” into the room that books the job; the person that “pops” on the screen. If they are serious about booking commercial work, have them watch commercials! (And what child doesn’t love more screen time?!) You can learn a lot about style, tone, and humor just by watching. Good luck!

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