Commercial Audition Tips for Teens

Commercial Audition Tips for Teens

2013-02-25T21:00:22-05:00February 25th, 2013|

There is lots of commercial work for teenagers. If you’ve never auditioned before, don’t be intimidated. Everyone had their first audition at some point. All auditioning is basically the same, in that the people casting are looking for the best talent they can find to fill the spot and the actors do the best work they can in order to book the role. It’s not likely that you will ever need a teenage monologue for a commercial audition. However, every actor should always have at least two contrasting monologues prepared at all times. You never know when you will be asked to perform one. In a commercial audition you will usually be asked to read “copy.” This is the term used for a portion (or all) of the script. Sometimes an audition only requires actors to improvise, but most times there is copy. Sometimes you can get the copy ahead of time but usually it is provided at sign in. You should arrive early. Casting directors frown on tardiness. They have a very full schedule and they need to keep the day moving. It is a good idea to look over the copy before signing in. This allows you more time to prepare and get comfortable before going in to audition. Once you sign in, you have to go in when called upon. That’s why you wait on the sign in. That being said, if you have a specific call time, you don’t want to sign in late for it. These days the commercial world is all about “being real.” You want to deliver the copy as though you were a real person having a conversation. Don’t play it too big or stagy.

You don’t have to memorize the copy for the audition, but if you are a quick study, it can help you give an honest, solid read. Do not attempt to do it by heart if there’s a chance you’ll blank out and forget your lines. There will be a poster board beside the camera with the lines written on it. In commercial auditions you play to the camera, which means you look into the lens. The trick with commercial auditions is to be able to glance at the copy, pick up the line and perform it into the camera lens. This is a skill that improves with practice. You should practice this technique at home or enroll in a commercial class if you want to do it professionally. Most importantly, look natural and be “loose.” It’s the person who brings that “extra something” into the room that books the job. If you are serious about booking commercial work, watch the real ones on TV and emulate the actors who are your type (the ones like you). They were cast because they do a great job. Learn from them.

Once you’ve done the audition, say thank you and leave. Do not get too chatty. The casting director has lot of people to see and it’s your work on camera, not your schmoozing that will book the role. Good luck!